How to Protect Your Children When Your Marriage Ends


As a parent, the end of your marriage can be an upsetting time for both you and your children, especially if there are issues over custody or visiting rights. However, whatever happens, you need to ensure that your children cope well with the end of your relationship and that they fully understand what is happening. In this guide, it will discuss the ways in which you can protect your children if your marriage ends. 

Hire a Divorce Attorney

Divorcing your partner when you have children can be complicated, especially if there are custody issues surrounding your child or both parents cannot come to a suitable agreement. However, by hiring a divorce attorney, they can help to achieve an outcome that benefits both you and your child, guiding you through the legal process and trying to resolve any issues with your divorce or the custody of your child outside of court. The ability of lawyers to come to a quick resolution will also help to keep the stress of the divorce away from your child. Visit deannabowen.com, and she can help to resolve any legal disputes between yourself and your partner that cover custody, child support, and paternity matters to get the resolution that is best for your child.

Talk to Children About Their Worries

When divorcing, you should make time to talk to your child about any worries that they may be experiencing and to lend a listening ear to their troubles, and you should try to do this as early into the divorce process as possible. By discussing the divorce openly with them, you will be able to help them to understand the implications of the divorce and what will happen. You should ensure that they know that they are still loved and this is not their fault. If you feel unable to cope with the worries of your child or believe that the divorce may be causing mental illness, you should seek a childhood counselor who can help your child to come to terms with the divorce through talking therapies and CBT.

Set Up Meetings With the Children

It is also often best for your children if you can set up regular visits between the child and the estranged parent, regardless of your personal feelings towards the ex, unless there is a direct danger to the child. Your child may also feel resentful and be unwilling to visit their other parent; however, you should try to support them in this by listening to their concerns, speaking positively about the other parent, and understanding what you can do to help the visit run smoothly.  

Keep the Same Routine 


One of the most important things that you can do for your child during a separation is to keep the same routine throughout the break-up, even if this is as simple as keeping bedtime the same. You should also, if possible, keep your child attending the same school and living within the same house, as this will help to maintain stability and continuity.

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