How to Reduce Your Chances of Being in a Car Accident



Auto accidents are the leading cause of death in the US for people between the ages 3 and 34. This is scary information, especially for parents with young children, or with teen or young adult drivers. We all have stories to share about knowing someone who was seriously injured in or perhaps even lost their life in a car accident. As a high schooler, numerous friends of mine were in car accidents, and a girl I graduated with lost her life just a few months after we walked the stage to receive our diplomas.



I became a much more cautious driver after I became a mom. I zip around all day with my children, ages 3, and 8. Their lives are worth me not speeding, touching my phone while driving, and staying ultra alert the entire time I am ever behind the wheel. While driving can be a lot of fun, and we do tend to have a fun time in the car as a family, it can also be incredibly stressful. Distractions are everywhere and learning how to cut down on them to help keep yourself and everyone else in your vehicle is absolutely essential.

1. Don't drink and drive.

We all know this is the number one no-no when it comes to driving safely. Sadly, it doesn't stop people from getting behind the wheel and causing accidents, many of which result in fatalities. Consuming alcohol lowers inhibitions, and may leave drivers thinking that they are 'fine to drive.' If you plan to have a drink while you're at a restaurant or social gathering, make sure another driver goes with you and doesn't drink. Having a designated driver with you is the best way to ensure you don't sit behind the wheel if you've had a little too much.

2. Avoid roadways during prime accident times.

There are some situations which will cause you to have to be driving at unseemly hours. If possible, however, avoid being on the roads between 10 pm and 4 am. These hours are prone to accidents, and DUI stops. If you happen to see someone driving erratically, call and report them. If you have a passenger with you, ask them to record the license plate number so you can share it when you call to report the scary driving. Doing this may just stop an accident from happening.

3. Go the speed limit, always.

My son sometimes gives me a hard time and tells me that I'm not a fun driver because I always stick to the speed limit. I was once pulled over and given a warning for going 73 in a 70 mph zone, and that was enough to make me never want to speed (even a little) again. Many people believe that if you 'go with traffic' or only go 5 mph over the speed limit, you won't get pulled over, but if you speed, you're just asking for trouble. The speed limit is the speed limit, and if you're going over the speed limit, you're breaking the law, plain and simple. Speeding can cause accidents, too, so keep that in mind as you travel. If you find yourself near someone who is obviously speeding or weaving in and out of traffic, try to move carefully over to an outside lane and reduce your speed to keep a safe distance from the offending vehicle.

4. Wear your seatbelt.

'Are you buckled?' is the first phrase out of my mouth after I have put my kids in the car and shut all of the doors. My son usually rolls his eyes as he says, 'Yes, mom! Why do you always have to ask us that?' Since it's so easy to become distracted in the car, I always ask my oldest if he remembered to buckle up. Thankfully, my car has a sounding bell that chimes if a front seat passenger isn't buckled, and I don't have to be 'that girl' and ask them to put their belt on. Seatbelts are there for a reason.

Protecting yourself and those you care about are priority number one when you're on the road. You also have to consider the lives and safety of those around you. Every life has merit. Don't forget that.

Brought to you by Fullerton Ford



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